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Louisiana Coastal Area Program (LCA), USACE Mississippi River Hydrodynamic & Delta Management Study

The Mississippi River Hydrodynamic and Delta Management (MRHDM) Study is the first large-scale, long-term restoration assessment investigated under the LCA Program. This study will identify and evaluate a combination of large-scale management and restoration features to address the long-term sustainability of the lower Mississippi River Deltaic Plain, as authorized under Section 7003 of the Water Resource Development Act (WRDA) 2007. The MRHDM study area covers the lower Mississippi River and surrounding deltaic regions. The hydrodynamic study effort will focus on the Mississippi River, while the delta management study effort will focus on the adjacent basins. This study area will be further defined as potential restoration opportunities are identified. Specifically, these modeling tools will be used to evaluate: hydraulics and the relationship of water flow conditions to sediment transport, salinities, deposition and erosion, and the net results of these processes on the river channel and its distributaries’ morphology. Ecosystem restoration features that maximize the deposition of Mississippi River sediment in coastal areas and aid in restoring delta growth and wetland sustainability will be identified and evaluated. Large-scale river diversions, dredging and outfall management measures will be considered.

FILE TYPE: link
DATE:02/07/2017
Louisiana Land Use Toolkit

The Louisiana Land Use Toolkit is an online resource for local jurisdictions. The Toolkit contains a model set of development regulations that can be used to help guide future growth and development in an sustainable and economically competitive manner. The Toolkit is a shared resource from which parishes and municipalities can adopt a complete development code or select cafeteria-style from individual tools that meet their specific needs. The Toolkit is intended to be used in two ways. At its simplest, the Toolkit is a standalone zoning or subdivision code, or a series of growth management tools that can be selected individually to meet specific needs. In its more complete form, the Toolkit can be combined and customized to build a complete development code. The following components make up the Louisiana Land Use Toolkit.

FILE TYPE: link
DATE:02/07/2017
Louisiana Municipal Association (LMA)

Association of Municipalities in Louisiana.

FILE TYPE: link
DATE:02/07/2017
FILE TYPE: .PDF
DATE:02/08/2017
Louisiana Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Program

Established in LAC 33:IX. Subpart 2. Chapter 23. Requires permits fro the discharge of pollutants from any point source into waters of the state. Applies only to facilities and discharges within the scope of the NPDES program.

FILE TYPE: link
DATE:02/07/2017
Louisiana Reclaimed Water Law

Established in Louisiana Revised Statutes, Title 30, Chapter 17, Section 2391 et seq. (Louisiana Reclaimed Water Law). Declares that the use of potable water for nonpotable uses is a waste of our most precious natural resource. Requires the use of reclaimed waters if a source exists. The law may encourage facilities to reuse or reclaim wastewater thereby eliminating discharges to waters of the state.

FILE TYPE: link
DATE:02/07/2017
Louisiana Sewage Sludge and Biosolids Program

Established in LAC 33:IX.Subpart 3.Chapter 73. Establishes standards for the use or disposal of sewage sludge generated during the treatment of domestic sewage. Consist of general requirements, pollutant limits, management practices, and operational standards. Sewage sludge (biosolids) applied to the land has nutrient management requirements found at LAC 33:IX.7303.

FILE TYPE: link
DATE:02/07/2017
Low Impact Development (LID)

LID is an approach to land development (or re-development) that works with nature to manage stormwater as close to its source as possible. LID employs principles such as preserving and recreating natural landscape features, minimizing effective imperviousness to create functional and appealing site drainage that treat stormwater as a resource rather than a waste product. There are many practices that have been used to adhere to these principles such as bioretention facilities, rain gardens, vegetated rooftops, rain barrels, and permeable pavements. By implementing LID principles and practices, water can be managed in a way that reduces the impact of built areas and promotes the natural movement of water within an ecosystem or watershed. Applied on a broad scale, LID can maintain or restore a watershed's hydrologic and ecological functions. LID has been characterized as a sustainable stormwater practice by the Water Environment Research Foundation and others.

FILE TYPE: link
DATE:02/07/2017
Low Impact Development (LID) "Barrier Busters" Fact Sheet Series

This seven-part series of fact sheets is primarily intended for state and local decision makers who are considering adoption of Low Impact Development (LID), but who have concerns with LID. These fact sheets explain the benefits of LID in clear terms and through examples. Specific fact sheets in this series directly address specific concerns that have been raised about adopting LID, thereby busting barriers.

FILE TYPE: link
DATE:02/07/2017